disgust


disgust
disgust vb Disgust, sicken, nauseate are comparable when meaning to arouse an extreme distaste in.
Disgust implies a stomach that is revolted by food offered or taken; in its extended use it implies sensibilities which are revolted by something seen, heard, or otherwise known that creates strong repugnance or aversion
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a disgusting medicine

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a disgusting smell

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disgusted by the vulgarity of men who ate noisily and greedily

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the very thought of such an occupation disgusted his fastidious nature

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the majority of women that he meets offend him, repel him, disgust him— Mencken

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Sicken usually implies not only the exciting of distaste but of actual physical distress (as faintness or a turning of the stomach); often, however, it is used merely as a more emphatic word for disgust, or it may suggest a disgust born of weariness or exhaustion
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the smell of certain flowers is sickening in its sweetness

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mine eyes did sicken at the sight, and could not endure a further view— Shak.

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she was sickened by the girl's affectations

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for a few evenings it had interested the sisters . . . but they had soon sickened of it and loathed it— Bennett

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his unctuous morality, which sickens later ages— Lewis & Maude

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Nauseate carries a stronger implication than disgust or sicken of loathsomeness (as to the taste, sight, or mind), and often suggests retching or vomiting
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he always finds castor oil nauseating

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just now, even the thought of food nauseates the patient

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they were all nauseated by the foul odor

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nauseating behavior

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we also cannot bring ourselves to deny him that famous, if dangerous, charm of his, nauseated as we may be by the excesses into which it so often misled him— J. M. Brown

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Analogous words: revolt, repulse, offend (see corresponding adjectives at OFFENSIVE)
Antonyms: charm
Contrasted words: tempt, entice (see LURE): gratify, delight, rejoice, *please

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Disgust — Dis*gust , n. [Cf. OF. desgoust, F. d[ e]go[^u]t. See {Disgust}, v. t.] Repugnance to what is offensive; aversion or displeasure produced by something loathsome; loathing; strong distaste; said primarily of the sickening opposition felt for… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Disgust — Dis*gust , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Disgusted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Disgusting}.] [OF. desgouster, F. d[ e]go[^u]ter; pref. des (L. dis ) + gouster to taste, F. go[^u]ter, fr. L. gustare, fr. gustus taste. See {Gust} to taste.] To provoke disgust or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • disgust — [dis gust′] n. [MFr desgoust, distaste < des (see DIS ) + L gustus, a taste, relish: see GUSTO] a sickening distaste or dislike; deep aversion; repugnance vt. [MFr desgouster < des (see DIS ) + L gustare, to taste] to cause to feel disgust; …   English World dictionary

  • disgust — (n.) 1590s, from M.Fr. desgoust strong dislike, repugnance, lit. distaste (16c., Mod.Fr. dégoût), from desgouster have a distaste for, from des opposite of (see DIS (Cf. dis )) + gouster taste, from L. gustare to taste (see …   Etymology dictionary

  • disgust — [n] aversion; repulsion abhorrence, abomination, antipathy, detestation, dislike, distaste, hatefulness, hatred, loathing, nausea, nauseation, nauseousness, objection, repugnance, revolt, revulsion, satiation, satiety, sickness, surfeit; concepts …   New thesaurus

  • disgust — ► NOUN ▪ strong revulsion or profound indignation. ► VERB ▪ cause disgust in. DERIVATIVES disgusted adjective disgustedly adverb. ORIGIN French desgoust or Italian disgusto, from Latin gustus taste …   English terms dictionary

  • disgust — index contempt (disdain), dissatisfaction, distress, odium, pique Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • Disgust — Yuck and Eew , two words often uttered to display disgust, redirect here. For the band Yuck , see, Yuck (band). For the activity yuck , see laughter. Disgust is a type of aversion that involves withdrawing from a person or object with strong… …   Wikipedia

  • disgust — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ great ▪ absolute, complete, pure, total, utter ▪ mild, slight ▪ …   Collocations dictionary

  • disgust — dis|gust1 [dısˈgʌst, dız ] n [U] 1.) a strong feeling of dislike, annoyance, or disapproval with disgust ▪ Joan looked at him with disgust. in disgust ▪ Sam threw his books down in disgust and stormed out of the room. to sb s disgust ▪ Much to my …   Dictionary of contemporary English


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